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Meyer Garber

Meyer Garber

December 1, 1928 to December 14, 2017
1972, Brookhaven National Laboratory

January 24, 2018 (PO63). Meyer Garber, a long time staff member of Brookhaven National Laboratory, passed away peacefully on December 14, 2017, at the age of 89.  After obtaining a doctorate from the University of Illinois he won a Fulbright scholarship to study in Holland.  He spent some time as an academic at the Michigan State University.  In the 1960s he joined Brookhaven National Laboratory where he worked on low-temperature physics and superconducting magnets for more than thirty years.  At Brookhaven, he worked with Bill Sampson and others in characterizing Rutherford cables and in magnet design. His work continued through the Superconducting Collider era.

He is remembered as a mentor and friend by many world-wide colleagues in the superconductivity community.  Lucio Rossi of CERN still uses planning graphs of critical current and load lines in lectures he gives on the history of superconductivity. Rossi noted that Garber helped INFN-Genova and INFN-Milano-LASA establish a multi kA test facility for Rutherford Cables. Steve Gourlay of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory cites the mentoring that Meyer did with him on a long distance basis regarding magnets and conductors including Nb3Sn.

In retirement, Garber loved sailing on the Great South Bay and watching  W.C. Fields movies.

Peter Wanderer, Lucio Rossi, Steve Gourlay and Bruce Strauss contributed to this obituary.