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ST508 - Study on Volume Reduction of Cesium Contaminated Soil by Magnetic Separation

Study on Volume Reduction of Cesium Contaminated Soil by Magnetic Separation

Kazuki Yukumatsu, Naoki Nomura, Fumihito Mishima, Yoko Akiyama, and Shigehiro Nishijima

Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan


E-mail: [email protected]

Abstract — In this study, we developed a new volume reduction method for contaminated soil by magnetic separation. We succeeded in selective separation of paramagnetic 2:1 type clay minerals, which strongly adsorb Cs, from 1:1 type clay minerals. As a result, it was shown that the radiation dose of 1:1 type clay minerals can be reduced.
We examined magnetic separation conditions for efficient separation of 2:1 type clay minerals. First, the separation rate of each particle size of 2:1 type clay minerals was calculated by particle trajectory simulation, because magnetic separation rate largely depends on the objective size. According to the calculation, 93.8% of 2:1 type of clay minerals could be separated at 7 T. Next, high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) experiment was conducted using superconducting magnet. 97 % of 2:1 type clay minerals were separated under the condition of 7 T and 3 cm/s of flow rate. The separation experiment of 2:1 type clay minerals from the mixture of 1:1 and 2:1 type clay minerals was performed at 7 T. 97 % of 2:1 type clay minerals were selectively separated from the model soil. It was shown magnetic separation with superconducting magnet would contribute to the volume reduction of contaminated soil.

Keywords (Index Terms) — Clay minerals, magnetic separation, radioactive Cs, superconducting magnet, volume reduction.

IEEE/CSC & ESAS SUPERCONDUCTIVITY NEWS FORUM (global edition), April 2016. 
Received November 20, 2015; Selected December 14, 2015. Reference No. ST508; Category 6. MT-24 preprint 4OrAA_03. Submitted to IEEE Trans. Appl. Supercond. for possible publication.